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Green juice is scary looking, say 28% of Americans

17-Feb-2014
Last updated on 17-Feb-2014 at 15:06 GMT - By Maggie Hennessy
Despite their trepidation over the look of green juice, many consumers find fruit and vegetable juices to be a more appealing way to incorporate fresh produce into their diets.
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Despite the recent surge in popularity of green juice and consumers’ general belief that it’s the most nutritious juice, many consumers are still skeptical that it actually tastes good, as a recent survey by Jamba Juice found. 

The survey of 2,200 US adults conducted by YouGov revealed that 28% "fear the look" of green juice, even though 32% think it is the healthiest juice option available. Not only that, but nearly a third (32%) say green juice is the one they like least, compared to just 9% who say they like it the best.

Despite their trepidation over the look of green juice, many consumers find fruit and vegetable juices to be a more appealing way to incorporate fruits and vegetables into their diets.

Although 89% of US adults believe that whole fruits and vegetables are better than juice, 68% say drinking juice is more convenient. Indeed, more than one in five say they would prefer to drink beets (21%) and dark leafy green vegetables like spinach (23%) and kale (20%) in juice, rather than eating them whole.

Millennials more open to green juice, drinking their veggies

The results of the YouGov study also highlighted a discrepancy between how Baby Boomers and Millennials view juice. Not only were Millennials more open to green juice, but also to the broader notion of drinking vegetables. 

Among the findings:

  • Millennials are twice as likely as Boomers to think that vegetables taste better in juice (39% vs 18%);
  • Millennials are twice as likely as Boomers to prefer green juice (13% vs 6%); and,
  • Millennials are twice as likely as Boomers to most often drink green juice (13% vs 6%).

Combined, two-thirds (66%) of Americans believe fresh-squeezed juice is healthy. But it’s not enough, as 2013 USDA data points out that Americans are only consuming 1/3 of the fruit and 2/3 of the vegetables they need each day, based on MyPlate serving suggestions. 

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